Geology of the Pacific Northwest

Assignments

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: The handout sheets for field trips are posted at the site for this class; additional reading materials will be linked to this page. For the reading assigments, I strongly suggest you take notes as you read.

Here are some optional introductory assignments you can do as a warm up for this class:

Wordsearch assignment 

Rock crossword puzzle



Week 2
Watch the intrusive Igneous rocks video (#14) at the Annenberg Earth Revealed Video series website.  When you go to the Annenberg site, you will be able to start the video by clicking on the little VoD box (video on demand) at the far right of each video description.


Week 3

Video assignments:  Either by going to the Kirk Library at Centralia College and checking out a video or online, watch the Annenberg Earth Revealed videos 17, Sedimentary Rocks.  Directions for watching the videos online appears at the Annenberg link above.


Week 4

Video assignments (3) due Monday April 29th:  Either by going to the Kirk Library at Centralia College and checking out a video or online, watch the Annenberg Earth Revealed videos 18, Metamorphic Rocks, and 10, Geologic Time. Directions for watching the videos online appears at the Annenberg link above. 


Week 5

a)      Text: Alt and Hyndman, Northwest exposures: Part 9, read and take notes on the intro on p. 325 and chapters 44, 47, and 49 on glaciers and glaciations. This assignment will help us to interpret some of the deposits we encounter on field trip 1 to the Puget Lowland on Friday May 3rd.

b)      Web: Read about Glaciation in Ritters virtual textbook of physical geography.  Read about the different aspects of glaciers under “topic outline” and in the review section go through the questions and take the self-assessment quiz. You are responsible for knowing all the material covered under important terms and concepts.


c) Be sure to read the materials on the geologic history of Washington by Jack Powell using the digital copy I will post online

Week 6


a) Text: Alt and Hyndman, Northwest exposures: (IMPORTANT: read this before the field trip to the Columbia River Gorge on Thursday May 16th). Part 8, p. 233. Late Tertiary time. In Chapter 33 the authors discuss a meteor impact somewhere in eastern Oregon during the Miocene.  Do they provide any physical evidence of such an event?  Chapter 34: Read about the great floods of basalt, the Columbia River Basalt Group is the formal name for this assemblage of humongous lava flows.  p. 245 note the discussion of the Grand Ronde flows, the Chief Joseph dike swarm, and the discussion of cooling and formation of lava columns on p. 250. Read to p. 251 and stop at “Rhyolite”.

b)  Northwest Exposures: Read up to page 85 in the book. Try using the online resource links in the geo-study guide posted on the pages to help you with terms and concepts you don’t understand. Or consult a dictionary of geology or any basic geology textbook. There are many useful links out there! 

Week 7.

You should continue reading in Northwest Exposures up to page 158 at least


Week 8.

By May 23rd you should be up to p. 260 in Northwest Exposures. In particular focus on Part 7 and Chapters 23–28 and 31–32 (pp. 157–196 and 215–232). Also focus on p. 241–260 and the great Columbia River Basalts. The authors propose the hypothesis that a bolide impact (meteor or comet) initiated these huge lava flows, however there are many other ideas—Pierce and Morgan suggest there are many lines of evidence to support a mantle plume hot spot, while James Sears of the University of Montana proposes a novel top-down approach. Which one of these hypotheses do you favor?


 

 

updated April  23, 2011